University of Arizona EMBI Researcher, Meredith Hay, PhD, Elected Senior Member of the National Academy of Inventors

Valerie PatmintraNews

Meredith Hay, PhD, professor of physiology in the College of Medicine – Tucson and member of the Evelyn F. McKnight Brain Institute at the University of Arizona, is one of the 61 academic inventors named to the 2021 class of National Academy of Inventors Senior Members. NAI Senior Members are active faculty, scientists and administrators from NAI Member Institutions who … Read More

NIH Director’s Lecture Series Featuring Kristine Yaffe, M.D.

Valerie PatmintraEvents

November 1, 2019 – The McKnight Brain Research Foundation hosted its eleventh annual Poster Reception in Chicago, Illinois on Sunday, October 20, 2019. From the 68 posters presented by scientists from the four McKnight Brain Institutes, six were selected to receive cash awards and certificates for display.

Diversity in Science: Making a Difference in Aging Brain Research

Valerie PatmintraNews

In this recent blog interview, Dr. Carol Barnes, Regents Professor and Director of the Evelyn F. McKnight Brain Institute at the University of Arizona, and Dr. Matt Huentelman, TGen’s Professor of Neurogenomics, discuss the powerful MindCrowd project and share their insights on how brain aging research benefits from diversity in science. MindCrowd is the largest online scientific research of the aging … Read More

Neuroscientists Weigh in on Spatial Cognition and the Hippocampus

Valerie PatmintraNews, Research

University of Florida neuroscientist Andrew Maurer, Ph.D., and University of Arizona psychologist Lynn Nadel, Ph.D., highlight the role of the hippocampus in spatial cognition and episodic memory in a new perspective piece published by the journal, Trends in Cognitive Sciences. “Spatial cognition” is the study of how humans take in and use knowledge of their environment to assess location, get … Read More

Cognitive Health

Valerie PatmintraCognitive Aging

Changes with your brain health happen slowly over time and aren’t always easy to detect. Changes in your ability to process, learn, or remember can be caused by stress, depression, loneliness, hearing and vision loss, and financial problems, among other difficulties.

Memory and Aging

Valerie PatmintraCognitive Aging

Changes with your brain health happen slowly over time and aren’t always easy to detect. Changes in your ability to process, learn, or remember can be caused by stress, depression, loneliness, hearing and vision loss, and financial problems, among other difficulties.